Out-of-Control FBI to Former Head of 9/11 Investigation: Butt out!

Russ Baker(RB) Interviews Bob Graham (BG) on Sarasota Saudi’s and “high level” FBI obfuscation.

BG: Yeah. And then, I had been able to read a couple of files of materials on Sarasota, and I pointed out where their public statement was not consistent with what was in their own classified files. And the FBI officer said: “Well, that was a matter of context, that there was other information which refuted the statements which were contained in the investigative officer’s report.”

So I said, “Well, can I see what that other information is?” And he said “yes” and we set a date for the week after Thanksgiving.

And when I went to the FBI office at the scheduled time, that same agent who [was at the meeting at Dulles] was there and he said: “Your meeting here has been canceled, is not going to be rescheduled, and incidentally, I know you’ve been trying to contact the agent who wrote the report, and I have told him not to talk with you.”

And that was the last time I met with a high-ranking FBI official.

RB: Now, without putting you too much on the spot, can you indicate how high a level we’re talking?

BG: Very high.

RB: Very high. Okay. So this might be a name that I might have heard of.

 BG: You might have.

full article

http://whowhatwhy.org/2015/04/27/out-of-control-fbi-to-former-head-of-911-investigation-butt-out/

False dilemma

The Logical Place

A false dilemma, or false dichotomy, is a logical fallacy that involves presenting two opposing views, options or outcomes in such a way that they seem to be the only possibilities: that is, if one is true, the other must be false, or, more typically, if you do not accept one then the other must be accepted. The reality in most cases is that there are many in-between or other alternative options, not just two mutually exclusive ones.

The logical form of this fallacy is as follows:

Premise 1: Either Claim X is true or Claim Y is true (when claims X and Y could both be false).

Premise 2: Claim Y is false.

Conclusion: Therefore Claim X is true.

This line of reasoning is fallacious because if both claims could be false, then it cannot be inferred that one is true because the other is false. This is…

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* Kenneth J. Dillon’s FOIA April 18, 2015 request to FBI for materials from September and October 2001 not previously produced